Archive for Apothecary

MTT: Marching Through Time

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2014 by creweofthearchangel

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel

April 25

April, typically a relaxing Month before the Hustle of the Pirate-hunting Season, has brought us to Jamestown at the behest of the Vigilant Crewe with whom we often work closely. They are attending to Business in the port City and the Crewe of the Archangel has joined them. Dorian and I made the familiar Journey from Carolina, stopping only once to obtain Monsieur Cyphers from Hampton, and arrived in Town late this Afternoon under dark Skies and in pouring Rain. We were greeted by Capitain McGuyver, his Wife, Nancy, and several of the Vigilant Crewe Members.



We were surprised to be welcomed as well as by two of our own Archangel Crewe Members, Monsieur Atlas and Monsieur Knyff who had not been expected to join us until Morning.
Following a multitude of Greetings, we quickly unloaded the Carriage and as we readied our Room we received Word from Capitaine Sterling that he and Fionn were to arrive in Town no later than Midnight. The Capitaine’s Message also carried a somber Piece of News: a beloved Member of the Community had passed away that Afternoon following a two year Battle with Illness. Capitaine Sterling asked that we make this News known to all present. The News was heavily received, and Silence took hold of the small Gathering of Sailors for more than a few Moments. T’is never easy to learn of the Passing of those we hold dear, but being with those of like Mind and Understanding made the News easier to bear.
After all present were settled in our Rooms, we made our way to a local Establishment both for Dinner and to toast the Life of our recently departed Friend. By then the Rain was slowing to a Drizzle and we had all begun to dry out from the Deluge that had occurred not but a couple of Hours prior. Dinner was plentiful and filling, and the Company was most heartily enjoyed; however, a damp Weariness was taking its hold on each of us. As the Food and Drink were nearly gone, the Table quieted and we knew that it was time for us to depart. As we arrived back at our Room, we received Word that Capitaine Sterling and Fionntan Murtaugh had arrived and they were making themselves comfortable in their respective Rooms. As I write this, I am perched in front of the Fire prepared for bed while Dorian checks in on Capitaine Sterling. The damp Weather reminds me of Home and I find myself dozing off every now and again with thoughts of what feels like Lives past.

April 26

We awoke this Morning and, after readying ourselves, made our way to the local Tavern for a light morning Meal. The Sun was bright, the Skies clear, and the Area was drying out from the Rains of yesterday. My Demeanor had brightened some as well, as I was off to the Shops near the Docks. I had been given an Invitation to meet with a family-trained Apothecary and spend the Day discussing the Trade with her while Dorian saw to his Duties as Master Gunner. I was somewhat Nervous, as my Training was informal at best in the Arts of Herbs, and my Knowledge is limited to those Herbs with which I am familiar. As I stepped into the Shop and looked around, I was met with the Aroma of dried Herbs and a smiling Apothecary greeting me from the Counter.
The Conversation in the Shop was much more relaxed than I had anticipated as she and I discussed our various Experiences with Herbs and making herbal Remedies, the Storage of our Herbs, and the Resources available should we ever need to use Herbs with which we are not familiar. After spending the Day orally compiling our Information, we concluded that perhaps we need to once again meet and create a Resource that could be then shared with the general Public. I left the Shop today feeling enlightened and hopeful that both she and I could benefit from such a Partnership, should our Circumstances favor such an Undertaking.
Following a lovely Dinner in the Tavern, some members of the Crewe joined with Vigilant Crew for Songs by the Fire. The rest of the Archangel Crewe, myself included, sat in a Corner listening to the Songs and holding friendly Conversation. After some time had passed, we realized that Clouds had covered the Sky and that it was beginning to rain. Dorian and I returned to our Room where I am now writing this entry and he is organizing the sea chest. Tomorrow, after some last minute business, we will once again return to the south road and our cottage in Carolina.

April 27

With a little more Time today I wanted to take in the Atmosphere of the Town before we departed. I donned my sailor’s Attire and wandered the Town as “Joseph” Legard, greeting others on the Street who were none the wiser. The Town was made up of a variety of Shops and Activities, with most of the Activity centered around the Tavern and the Docks. In the Tavern, Patrons were taking part in card Games while snacking on Fruit and Biscuits and drinking the available Beverages; on the Docks, Sailors were splicing Lines and testing repaired log Lines in the Water; a Woman was attending to Laundry at the end of the Dock; Captain McGuyver and other Vigilant Crew members were attending to business in his office on the docks; Capitaine Sterling could be found attending to business with Cargo costs and taxes; Monsieur Lasseter was attending to the cleaning and maintenance of the Firearms and edged Weapons; Vigilant Crew members were handling the Shot and various other Weapons; The Archangel's Blacksmith chatting with the Vigilant's Heidiand Members of both Crewes could found helping in the Kitchen.
As the Work was completed, we all began to pack up our Belongings for our individual journeys home. Dorian, Adam, and I were permitted to leave as early as possible, as News had reached us of foul Weather at Home while we were away which carried the Potential of damaging our Property. After saying our Goodbyes, which is always the most difficult Part of an event, we made our way South to Carolina. The Journey was smooth, and we arrived Home slightly earlier than anticipated, finding that only a Flag perched on our Home had been damaged; the worst of it had been East of our Cottage.




Archangel

Copyright 2014 J.Otte

Thinking Back: Josephine Legard, Indentured Servant and Herbalist

Posted in Crewe Reflections... with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 29, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

Who are you?

Josephine Legard, an indentured servant from Cancale, in the Brittany region of France.

What are your dealings with the Archangel?

I am indentured to the Master Gunner of the Archangel, Dorian Lasseter.

What is your most memorable event concerning that relationship, and do you have any prized possessions connected to the event?

My most memorable event would be my rescue from my indenture from St. Malo by Monsieur Lasseter. I was indentured to a rather unkind tavern owner in the city, and the Archangel crewe took rest at our tavern following a great storm that damaged their ship. They were disguised as Frenchmen so as to receive kind treatment. Toward the end of their stay, Dorian Lasseter was involved in a game of cards with the tavern owner. The owner bet my papers in a last ditch effort to recoup his losses, but was defeated and my papers passed to Monsieur Lasseter.

I still carry a letter in my pocket, written by my brother when he was forced upon a ship bound to New France. It was the last word I had from him, and my last connection to St. Malo. I carry it in the hopes that I will someday find him again.

NOTE: In the late 17th/early 18th century many women often kept Herbals, books or scrap books containing herbal remedies known to work, to care for their families.

“The housewife is assured that she will not be asked to deal with the ‘depth and secrets of this most excellent art of physic,’ receiving instruction only in ‘some ordinary rules and medicines which may avail for the benefit of her family…for the curing of those ordinary sicknesses which daily perturb the health of men and women’.” Gervase Markham

For more information on the subject, please see the following:

Anna’s Herbal, An Education in the Healing Power of Herbs
Geraldine Brooks, Year of Wonders
Sharon Hiltz, 2011
http://www.fairmontstate.edu/collegeoflibe…AS%20HERBAL.pdf

The English Housewife, Gervase Markham
Edited by Michael R. Best
http://books.google.com/books?id=bJ2KV5vfz…epage&q&f=false

For more on Josephine Legard, click here
https://creweofthearchangel.wordpress.com/2…-joseph-legard/
Copyright September 2013/J.Otte

Beaufort Pirate Invasion 8-10 August

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 17, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

To Mistress Murin McDonough
The Selkie’s Hyde
Hampton Roads
Virginia
11 August

My dearest Cousyn Murin,

Once again I hope that this Missive finds you well. The Merriweather Lads are in good Health. Captain has been under the Care of the Doctor but is feeling nearly himself now. I myself am at this writing in a weakened State as ill Spirits attack but, with God’s Grace and not the Doctors prescribed “Pine Tears” I will recover quickly.

Earlier in the Month the Captain received Word that there were Spanish Pirates in the Area of the North Carolina Colony harassing the Citizens of the Town of Beaufort. I know that ye are well aware of Captain Sterling’s opinion of Criminals who ride the Waves so it will come as no surprise that we have made haste to that Towne to lend Assistance in any way we might.

On Wednesday, the seventh of August, we approached the Shore Town of Beaufort with English Colors flying high. We anchored the Archangel then rowed to Shore. The Captain his Sons, Sean and Joshua Merriweather and I were first to Land. The locals appeared cautious as we approached but once Captain Sterling offered to help protect the Town against the invading Spanish we were greeted heartily and all manner of People from the Towne offered to help us.

We quickly brought Camp Gear and one Great Gun (always Gabriel is with us) ashore and set up the beginnings of a small Encampment near the Town’s Gaol with the Captains Tent and a smaller one for the Midshipmen. We also made use of what was left of an old Spritsail to create a Lean-to to Lodge Sailors at night and under which we might find additional Shade throughout the day. The Moisture in the air was great and our Clothes were soaked through by the effort put forth!

Amongst those in the first Shore Party was a newly recruited young Sailor Mitchell O’Sionnach. Happy am I that the wise Captain has found himself yet another skilled Irish Lad! Sterling made good use of him in assisting with the set-up of the Encampment and running Errands. I must say that the Lad O’Sionnach is a hard Worker eager to learn and help when he can and has already proven himself an asset to the Crewe. Grateful were we that the Locals offered to ease our Burden by offering a Hand in set-up for it made our Work go quickly.

Once settled we found an Establishment willing to serve us at a late Hour and had a meager Meal. Watches were set and we slept as peacefully as we could throughout the hot Night.

Thursday Morning came far too quickly in the hot Weather for my liking. Shortly thereafter Master Gunner Lasseter and his Indentured Servant Josephine Leguard were brought ashore and the Encampment grew by one Tent. The Officers met with the town’s folk as O’Sionnach, Josephine and I continued to set up the Encampment, filling the Cisterns with fresh Water, gathering Wood for Fire and tending to the needs of the Camp.

Captain asked that we also erect a small Wedge Tent for Master Blacksmith Cyphers. Master Cyphers, usually quite happy to string up his Hammock, had this past week, fallen when the Ship pitched unexpectantly and injured his Knee. The Doctor has prescribed that he stay off of it, a Prescription that Master Cyphers is quite unaccustomed to following. He has, however, suffered through the Horror of being waited on and may actually be allowing himself to enjoy the fact that the Crewe does indeed care for his well being and comfort.

Doctor Geiger and the Heathen Pilot Blackhorse brought Provision of Food to the Encampment. The Doctor is insistant that we eat a variety of fresh Foods, Fruits and Vegetables when available so he had the Heathen take him about the Area to see what might be found. Beaufort is a small and thinly inhabited Town. Outside the Towne there are still some native Peoples, having Blackhorse with him proved to be an asset in trading for the Crewe Nutritional needs. Tis a good change from Hardtack and Fish Stew. Doctor Geiger was also able to acquire a few Leaches in his search stating that they will not likely live long at Sea but he is glad to have them when he can. I watched him use one to help O’Sionnach with his ill Humors, rather interesting that was.doc and leeche tup

Once Camp was set the Captain ordered that one more small Tent be set up for the Ships paying Passenger Princess Jülide and her Child “Kitty” be brought to the Encampment feeling that she would be safer there. He also gave orders that the Laundress Mae Harrington be brought into Camp. I believe that he prefers her where we might keep watch over her given her questionable mental stability. Quite frankly, if I could, I would avoid her all together but my Work requires that I interact with her almost daily. I would rather reattach a Button on my own before I would ask her to do so. It is best to tread lightly with that one since the Accident.

The Encampment remained quiet all Evening with everyone going about their own activities. The Evening turned to night, watches were once again set and all were abed early.

On Friday, the ninth Day of August we were up and about our work early as usual. The Officers met with the local Constabulary to discuss how we might help against the Invasions by the Spaniards. Many of the Towns Inhabitants came to visit our Encampment and found interest in Camp Activities so we shared what Knowledge of Weapons and Tactics, and Navigation. The doctor was able to impart some Wisdom to those who showed interest in his Skills. The Children found the Heathen’s Tales highly fascinating. The Laundress also made a few extra Pence washing Laundry for a few of the Sailors in Port. Josephine was able to find some of the Ingredients for her Apothecary Stores and even had some of the Children in the Towne assist in the making of some Concoction.

The Afternoon brought an Attack by Spanish Pirates who were defeated before coming ashore. The Archangel sent Word from the Ship with Custis Makemie and Shaughnessy Barnidge to the Captain and the two Men then remained with us on shore, gladly lending a Hand as needed. Aye, two more Irishmen, the Captain attracts good Folk! The Towne was in celebration after turning away the Spanish once again. The Princess was asked to Dance. I know that the Captain was not pleased by this. Her dance, shameful by some standards. Please say nothing to the Captain for I would not disgrace him by admitting that such beauty and grace is indeed pleasing to watch.

Later that evening much of the town, still in Celebration, gathered for a Meal and some Entertainment. Many of the Ships in Port offered up someone to sing or play. I was asked by the Captain to sing “Over the Hills and Faraway” as part of the entertainment. I was not in my best Voice due to a soreness in my throat but I believe that I managed well enough. Would that you were there for your Voice has always been more pleasing than mine dear Cousyn.

Saturday followed Friday, as it is want to do, and I found myself having to defend the Captains Breakfast from little miss Kitty who came in with wooden Sword drawn. I was forced to draw the largest wooden Spoon I could find do fight her off! The Lass brightens even the darkest Day. She is a sweet one with a Smile that lights up the Camp, fair of Face like her Mother. Not once on the Voyage have I seen or heard her complain or misbehave.

The Day once again grew hot quickly. The Lass, Kitty, was able to keep cool in the Laundress’s wash Tub, would that I too would fit! The Crewe’s Work on shore was nearly done and the Captain’s Things set in order when the Call went up from the town that Spanish were once more making way to attack. The Master Gunner called for me to man the great Guns that had been brought ashore along with Blackhorse, Joseph, and the Doctor, who ran the Powder so that he could be on the Field and available if any injuries needed tending. One small Vessel with only three or four rowdy Spaniards came forward and were easily thwarted with a few shots across her Bow and a few local Women throwing rotten Fruit at them. We scoffed at the Attack but did not lay off the watch for a larger Ship had been reported earlier. Sure as the Sun will rise, the larger Ship sailed into our range and the true Battle began. Great Guns ringing on both sides. A few of the Pirates manage to make it to Shore. The Casualties on both sides were few but the Doctor’s Services were indeed needed. With our aid the local Militia and towns folk were able not only to save the Town but also captured two of the Pirates to bring into town for a Trial.

I myself was charged with keeping the prisoners in line. We made good use of the Gaol and the towns folk were able to come “pay their respects” to the pirates who awaited trial. I tell you there was no love there and the Gaoler was able to make a few shillings for himself.

With the governor out of town it fell to Captain Sterling to officiate at the trial. The first Lad, one Thomas Smyth, brought before the good Captain claimed to have been pressed into service claimed to be an apprentice to a “felter”. The boy swore to sign on to the Archangel at least until he was able to earn passage back to his homeland so the Captain released him into the custody of the Master at Arms. As to the second prisoner I am sad to report the man, Lochlainn Tiarnach, also from our beloved Ireland was defiant through it all. He, being Irish, I had hoped to would find some remorse in him but there was none. He had no defense just defiance. The crowd began to call for him to be hanged . The Captain passed sentence, death. Tierney’s last drink, which Captain Sterling granted him, was used not to quench his thirst but to spew on the Captain! He looked at me as if I were the traitor not he. I can not say that this surprises me given the history between the English and the Irish but attacking innocent Townsfolk, no matter who he serves, makes him a criminal. Finally the Captain could stand it no longer and the crate that held him above the crowds for all to see was kicked from beneath him. The life choked out of him slowly. Dearest Cousyn, I will never become accustomed to watching someone hanged. Never.

The Evening allowed some Time to relax and the Captain and his Boys, along with Kitty played nine pin. The Locals once again, fed us as they celebrated the Engagement of two of their own. The Feast gave those who call the Archangel home another chance to socialize. The Captain even extended his Table and invited all to join in the Meal.

The Weatherglass rose so all was made ready for the impending Storm. As is often the case, these Instruments of prognostication are not always easily read and what was to be a Storm was but a short period of Rainfall that barely dampened the Canvas and did not dampen the Spirits of the Crewe and Guests at all. Thus the Celebration continued until Midnight

Sunday brought new Orders from Captain Sterling. The Towne now in the Hands of its Citizens and the Spanish defeated, the Encampment was packed and loaded once again onto the Archangel. We bad farewell to the Town of Beaufort and weighed Anchor at about two Hours past noon.

It is my hope that the Captain will be making for Hampton soon and then to his Plantation, Migdal-El, not far from there in Virginia. If that be the case then I am sure he will take Time to visit ye at the Hyde while in Hampton. I then shall ask leave of him to visit with ye, for it has been far too long since I have taken the Time to enjoy yer Company.

Your humble Servant & devot’d Cousyn,
James Fionntan Murtaugh

Copyright September 2013/M. Fleckenstein
Special Thanks to Diane Shultz & Jason Goldsmith for the use of their photographs

How to Make Herbal Concoctions

Posted in How to with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 12, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel

June 19

When preparing herbal concoctions for crewe members, I often am asked a multitude of questions regarding my practice. Although I am not a doctor, and I cannot always explain the medical reasons why my concoctions work as they do, I receive my information on good authority before I use it. Trying to explain the difference between a tea, a decoction, and an infusion; a salve, a poultice and a bath; what exactly is a tincture, &c., all the while treating the ill or wounded is a rather trying task. In an attempt to clarify my thoughts so that I may better answer the questions of the curious, I thought perhaps I would put them down in this journal so that they are fresh in my mind regularly.

Teas, Decoctions, and Infusions
Teas are made by boiling water and placing a teabag filled with the herb into the water to steep. The teabag can be made of muslin or another thin fabric that will allow the herbal oils to seep into the water while keeping the herb itself out of the water. The herb should steep for 10-15 minutes, with the tea having a slightly bitter taste which can be sweetened with honey. This bitterness is an indication of the medicinal qualities.

(A tea cup, tea bag, and white willow bark for making a tea of the herb)

Decoctions are similar to teas, except that the herbs are placed directly into the water before it is boiled. This allows for the oils to seep more directly into the water itself. The water can then be strained while being poured, preventing the herb pieces from entering the cup. This treatment may make for a stronger medicinal quality.

Infusions are similar to teas in that the herbs are allowed to steep in the hot, boiling water, however this process is done in an air-tight container for several hours at the very least. Infusions can be taken as a drink or can be applied externally to wounds or trouble areas. If taken as a drink, the infusion does not need to be hot; it can also be temperate or ice cold.

Salves, Poultices, Balms and Baths
Salves are concoctions that are applied externally to the skin in an attempt to heal a wound or other health problem. Salves are made using either fresh or dried herbs that are ground in a mortar and pestle and then mixed with mineral water or Aloe vera juice. Not only will salves heal external wounds, but when applied externally they will aid swelling in muscles and joints.

(Crushed herb being added to a small amount of water to make a salve)

Poultices are made using the herbs that remain after making an infusion. The liquid infusion can be used to wash the area of the skin and the herbs are then placed directly onto the affected area. If it is preferred that the herbs not enter the wound directly, wrap them in muslin or another thin clean cloth and place them on the wounded area. This wrapping can be dipped in the infusion liquid as well.

Balms are made using oil in the place of water. A base oil is used, such as grape seed oil, and is warmed over a low heat source. Once the oil is warm, beeswax is added and permitted to melt into the oil. Once the beeswax has melted, the mixture is removed from the heat source and oils are added based on their desired medicinal effects. When the mixture cools, it has a thick consistency that can easily be applied to skin.

(An agrimony balm to treat wounds)

Baths are simply made of warm water and the desired herb depending on the illness or injury. The warm water is added to a bowl containing the herb, and clothes are soaked in the water and then applied to the injured area. Occasionally, such as with English ivy for wound treatment, the leaves themselves can be applied directly instead of the cloths.

Tinctures
Tinctures, unlike the other concoctions listed above, are alcohol based and take a longer period of time to cure. When making tinctures, the desired herbs are placed in a glass container that can be sealed. The jar is then filled with a clear alcohol in the highest percentage alcohol by volume that the maker can afford, making sure that all of the herbs are completely immersed in the alcohol. The container is then sealed and stored in a temperate environment, with no extreme temperature fluctuations, for six to eight weeks. Occasionally during this time period, the container should be gently shaken so as to mix the herbs and alcohol thoroughly. After the six to eight weeks, the herbs should be strained from the container and the liquid kept in a dark place or in a dark glass to maintain its quality.

(A case bottle of alcohol and an echinacea tincture in a small bottle kept in the nearby bag for darkness)

Through the use of these techniques with the proper herbs is the Crewe of the Archangel kept healthy. I am truly thankful to be able to be a help to the crewe in return for my rescue from the inn in St. Malo.

Copyright 9/2013 J.Otte

Beaufort Pirate Invasion 8-10 August

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 19, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

Excerpts from the Journals of Alice Mason and Mae Harrington
Alice Mason and Mae Harrington

Alice Mason
Thursday

After a long but uneventful journey, we are docked in the town of Beaufort. Credible reports of invading ships from Spain led the captain to make this detour. The townspeople welcomed the arrival of reinforcements against the Spanish pirates and have been most accommodating. Other ships already wait in the harbor, lines and sails prepared for the invasion, whenever it comes.

Being civilians, the laundress Mae Harrington, Kitty, and I were some of the last to disembark the Archangel and arrive in camp. Already present were Mr. Dorian Lasseter the Master Gunner, Josephine Legard his indentured, Matthew Black Horse the heathen pilot, Mr. Adam Cyphers the blacksmith, Sean Merriweather and Joshua Merriweather, Dr. Gerome Geiger, Mr. Mitchell O’Sionnach, Fionntan Murtaugh the captain’s steward, and of course, Captain John Sterling himself.
pennant new
The night is humid and heavy, the heat of the day lingering long after the sun has set. Kitty and I, together with the unsettling laundress, have been given temporary quarters in an unused portion of the goal until our tent can be readied on the morrow. T’is time we got some rest, but I will be sleeping with one eye open…

Mae Harrington
Friday

My eyes open to sunlight filtering through the bars of the gaol windows. Mistress Mason and the child have begun to stir, and I hear the sounds of the camp awakening outside. I arise and dress quickly. Hurrying down the stairs and out of the gaol, I encounter the steward. Fionn directs me to where our cargo was unloaded the previous night, and I sort through crates until I locate my belongings, as well as those of Mistress Mason and Kitty. With the assistance of a few members of the crewe, our tent is quickly erected and our belongings stowed away.

Now the day’s work begins in earnest.
487968_201140483388648_1991909703_nCaptain Sterling, Mister Lasseter and the men-at-arms are engaged in checking and rechecking the state of their weapons and discussing plans of action. The steward is preparing breakfast and tidying the Captain’s tent.

Mlle. Legard is at work with her herbs, laying in stock any medicines that may be needed after the battle. Likewise the good doctor is taking stock of his implements and preparing for an influx of the wounded.

Mistress Mason settles herself on a cushion beneath the shade of a tree with a delicate bit of sewing as Kitty explores the encampment. 581751_10151796609088497_1698029913_nHaving suffered an injury to the knee prior to our departure, the Blacksmith reclines on a rug and keeps us company as we go about our duties. I enlist the help of the heathen guide and one of the midshipmen to fill the large washtubs and call for dirty laundry.

As the day wears on, there is a constant stream of both militia and civilians through our camp. The reputation of the Archangel’s Captain and crewe has indeed preceded us. Gunners stop to admire our great guns and ask questions as to their operation and care, civilians walk past with wide-eyed children clinging to their hands, curiosity eventually prodding them to say a few words or ask questions. The doctor’s instruments, the heathen’s trappings, ship’s navigational equipment, the games played to pass long voyages at sea, even the mundane methods of laundry are of great interest to some. Kitty drew smiles and laughter when she decided that my tub of clean water was the ideal place to escape the heat and dust.
63690_201141206721909_2115225926_n

The hours pass quickly. As the evening approaches, a call for entertainment is made throughout the encampments. The best talents are nominated to represent each crewe, and a stage is set up. The steward, Fionn, has a magnificent singing voice and is elected to represent the Archangel’s crewe. Singers, musicians, poets, actors…a diverse lot of entertainers join together and give us a most enjoyable evening.

Dinner1003508_201137613388935_651941966_n is a quiet affair. Tomorrow will most likely bring a battle, and rest is needed. We sit together in groups of twos and threes, talking quietly until the call for lanterns-out is given.

543412_10151805320263497_209061262_nMae Harrington
Saturday

Saturday morning broke hot and humid. All over the encampment preparations for battle continue. Breakfast is hurried, appetites are small. Mid-morning, the boom of a distant cannon echoes across the water, and a shout goes up. Spanish warships have been sighted far out in the bay and are advancing toward the town with great speed.1176244_10151805228993497_1000591672_n Mistress Mason, Kitty and I bid the Captain and gunners farewell as they gather their weapons and hasten to join the other defenders along the waterfront. Long hours pass with no news of how the battle fares. 1174745_10151805316268497_1901944436_nShouts, the boom of the great guns and staccato bursts of fire from the small arms provide a persistent background to our mornings’ work. At long last the noise subsided, and our crew returned bringing tidings of victory. The Spanish are defeated, those remaining alive have returned to their ships and fled, and the handful taken prisoner are swiftly confined in the gaol. 1000941_10151805322838497_1335752218_n

Alice Mason
Saturday

There is much celebrating after the battle, with music and dancing all along the waterfront. Due to my Turkish attire no doubt I was invited to participate in one of the dances for the amusement of the militia and townsfolk, and found that I enjoyed it a good deal, though I am certain the captain did not approve.
1170736_10201020510614047_860802453_na
The festive mood lingered even hours later, when the captured pirates were brought forth to be hanged. Captain Sterling as the proper authority heard the men plead for their lives. The first two were pardoned, 535869_618261141527606_1726804475_nhaving been pressed into service by the pirates. The third was not so fortunate. 1174982_618264384860615_1972795270_nAn Irishman by name of Laughlin Tierney, he was defiant from the start. When offered a final request he asked for a tankard of water, of which he only drank a small portion and then flung the greater part into Captain Sterling’s face. After that little time was wasted. 1186861_618267444860309_1640788118_nrobinAmid the raucous demands of the crowd, the crate that supported the man was kicked from beneath him and he danced about on the end of the line before finally hanging slack.

The remainder of the afternoon was spent about our duties. Numerous townsfolk still filtered through the camp, discussing the events of the day amongst themselves and with various crew officers. As the sun began to sink lower and the heat of the day began to ease, everyone gave themselves to more pleasurable amusements. The captain arranged a game of Skittles, or Nine-Pins, with the Merriweather boys and Kitty and it was difficult to tell whom enjoyed the game most. skittles game tupMost of the crew gathered to watch, and afterward we all sat down to another fine meal prepared by the townsfolk.

That is always the best part of any day, when the crew and passengers such as myself and Kitty sit together at the captain’s table, to fellowship and enjoy the harmony we find amongst ourselves. Even the captain and I have learned to put aside our differences for those couple of hours, and the conversation and laughter flows freely. 1150258_201741913328505_1748179776_n

As night came on the weather glass indicated incoming weather, so the camp was a flurry of activity as tents were secured, belongings covered, and all made ready for the storms. In the end there was only a little rain instead of the squall line that we feared, but for the duration of it the majority of the crew sheltered in another unused portion of the goal, to continue the fellowship begun at the dinner table until it was time to retire for bed.

Alice Mason
Sunday

Today we are to return to the Archangel and continue on our voyage. The day is as sweltering as the two previous. By mid-morning trunks are packed and tents lowered. When all the canvas is folded and stored away we say our final goodbyes to the townsfolk. The noon hour passes before we finally go on our way in the afternoon, leaving this small town that has found a place in all our hearts. 935937_10151796661063497_1558886659_n1170771_201295210039842_431509565_n734345_10151803396053497_1107213202_n

Copyright8/2013S.W.Permenter/J.Ashing
With special thanks to Diane Shultz for the use of her photographs.

Blackbeard Pirate Festival, 2013 Hampton, Virginia

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 24, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel
F102D800DSC_1616-001

May 31

Dorian and I awoke early; we plac’d the last of our belongings atop the carriage, and left the cottage on our way to Hampton, Virginia. It was in Hampton that we were instructed to meet with the rest of the Crewe of the Archangel. The Captain had overheard a rumor that a pirate gathering was to be held within Hampton, and he felt that we should make our presence known to protect the town and possibly arrest suspect’d pirates. T’was a short, uneventful ride into Hampton and we soon met with the crewe members who had already arriv’d and we quickly pitch’d our tent. This afternoon we spent a great deal of time with the crewe, arranging the responsibilities of each member for the length of our stay in Hampton, and laying out a game plan for protecting the town. The Captain was inform’d of a ball to be held not but a short distance away, so he and Monsieur Lasseter made their way to the site of the ball, and press’d those entering the building for their papers. I remain’d in camp with Fionn, Doctor Geiger, Monsieur Atlas, and those who arriv’d later in the evening, while awaiting the return of Mon Capitaine and Monsieur Lasseter. It has been a long day, the men have return’d from the ball, the Capitaine none too pleased to see his one time fiancé in attendance having turned Turk, and I expect another hot day tomorrow. Mon Capitaine and Fionn have been summon’d back to the plantation and so are preparing to ride back this evening, so Dorian shall be maintaining order amongst the crewe until their return, and I shall be disguising myself as Joseph in order to be of assistance. 983712_4847499107767_1810845113_n

June 1

We awoke early to a bright, clear sky and air that felt as though it clung to our skin; t’was another hot, humid day. We assembl’d in camp for a crewe meeting and to prepare for the day’s activities. Mon Capitaine and Monsieur Murtaugh had left last night to attend to Mon Capitaine’s business at home, and Monsieur Lasseter brief’d the rest of us on the situation at hand. It seemed that a small contingent of pirates was to approach Hampton by water, and that we were to take our great gun, Gabriel, to the waterfront in order to defend the town against the incoming pirates. T’was only expect’d to be a small band of raiders, so no more than a shot or two would be necessary. We gathered and mov’d the great gun to a spot on the point overlooking the river, where we join’d with other militia to take aim against the suspect’d pirates. At first sight of the boat and sail, a volley was fired from the guns position’d on the point; although there was little or no damage done to the pirates, they retreat’d. View More: http://jonandbecky.pass.us/blackbeard-festival-2013 With the city safe for a time, we returned to camp with Gabriel in tow and readied the cart for a press gang, as Archangel has lost a number of crewe this past year and is in need of strong backs to carry the ship along in a most speedy manner. The heat, by this early point, was already taking hold of the crewe. Although we were doing our best to keep our thirst to minimum, it seem’d we were sweating out the liquids as fast as we were taking them in.

View More: http://jonandbecky.pass.us/blackbeard-festival-2013

Despite the high temperatures, the crewe members partaking in the press gang carried and escorted the worn ox cart along the waterfront and to the small square where we expected to find sailors to be press’d. We were not disappointed, as we were able to round up a hand full of men to press onto our ship. We brought them all to the cart and tied them to the rear, although one escaped and had to be chased by several of our crewe members to return him to the cart. He received a proper beating to keep him in line as we returned to camp. Many citizens heckled the pressed men as we made our way back to camp, knowing that they tried to escape impressment. Once back in camp, they were properly fitt’d out and introduced to their new crewe members before being permitted to retire for the evening in camp. The remainder of the crewe caught a few much need’d moments of rest, and several men took to necessary tasks such as Monsieur Ryerson, a newly pressed man, who deftly splic’d a chip board to its log line.

Around mid-afternoon, Capitaine Sterling and Monsieur Murtaugh return’d to camp, and settl’d themselves into the encampment once again, just in time for dinner. F108D90DSC_4780-001_nets We dined on chicken, corn, fruits, and bread as we discussed the handling of the pirates for the remainder of the trip. This evening, as we made our way to the waterfront for a fireworks show, the pirates’ sail appeared again on the river. After yet another volley, the boat disappear’d and the fireworks show was able to continue. We return’d to camp and enjoy’d a round of punch before retiring to our tent. It has been a long, hot day but the city has yet to be overrun with the pirates as they feared. Capitaine believes that tomorrow we shall monitor the situation, and as long as the city has the defense under control, we shall break camp and return to our abodes. For now, rest is in order.Atlas Cooking Hampton Retouched

June 2

Dorian and I awoke early, yet again, to a bright, clear sky but with a slight breeze, which lift’d our spirits. We hoped the breeze would help to somewhat lessen the effect of the heat, and we were not disappoint’d. Word had reached camp that the pirates were to make one last attempt on the city of Hampton, and our assistance was request’d at the point one last time. The crewe moved the great gun, Gabriel, down to the firing line, and I join’d them and several other crewe members who were not firing the guns near the line to watch the battle.941497_10200159072679388_1878124050_n There were enough hands to run the guns, so my disguise was not necessary. After nearly a handful of shots from the guns at the point, the pirates were once again forced to retreat, and the city of Hampton was safe. Around noon, the crewe once again attempt’d to obtain new sailors through the use of a press gang, and those collect’d were returned to camp. Quite a few more were gather’d today than yesterday. I have no doubt that they will soon resign themselves to their impressment. After a brief period of rest, we broke camp, pack’d the carraiges, and began the journey back to our respective homes, leaving the city of Hampton once again safe from the pirate invaders. As Dorian and I approach our cottage, I cannot help but wonder what adventure our next voyage shall bring…

Adam with Punchbowl Hampton FB retouchedF108D90DSC_4710-001_netsF108D90DSC_4996-001_netsF102D800DSC_1630-001Alice Standing Hampton Retouched

Copyright 2013 J.Otte
Special thanks to James Callahan for the use of his photos.

Military Through the Ages, Jamestown Settlement, Williamsburg, Virginia

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 2, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

josephine

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel

Friday, 28, April 1719
I stood on the deck as the Archangel moor’d just off of the western shore of Ile de Ré around midday. As the crewe load’d the boats, which would ferry the burial party and our necessary goods ashore, I could not help but admire the beauty of the island. Somewhere in my mind, I recall’d being a little girl and overhearing my father talk about the religious siege that took place long ago on the island. It was hard to believe that such a beautiful spot held such a violent past. My thoughts were broken by the Master Gunner’s voice calling me to his side. It was time to go disembark.
Those of us going ashore climb’d into the boats and made our way to the beach, along with several injured and two dead crewe members, one of whom was Lieutenant Hazzard. Images of the most recent battle in the Mediterranean flash’d through my mind and I shuddered as I tried to remove it from my head. The cloudy weather add’d to the somber mood as we work’d to set up camp and build a fire before darkness fell. The dead men were laid out under a canopy within our camp, the Lieutenant in his burial clothes and the seaman in his hammock. The Archangel, having suffer’d minor damages during an attempt on a merchant ship during our latest conflict, the War of Quadruple Alliance in the Mediterranean, made way for La Rochelle on the mainland for quick repairs. Although we hope it to be a short stay, the officers intend to remain until the wounded, the captain being one of such, recuperate. We had removed several great guns from the ship when we left, bringing them on shore with us as a means of protection. Having set up camp and eaten a light dinner, we have retired to our tents for the night. Tomorrow begins the burial process.

Saturday, 29 April, 1719
We awoke early, as there was much work to be done, and found that the weather had deteriorated further. The clouds overhead open’d up around mid-morning, forcing several crewe members to maintain the fire and the rest of us to move as much of our chores under canvas as possible. I, myself, moved my basket under the canopy with the doctor and the dead, and began attending to my remedies. Josephine and Matt by the fire With the injured members of the crewe among us, I was only too happy to assist Dr. Geiger. I had brought along several simple herbal physicks for injuries, both internal and external, and spent the day prepping the herbs and administering them to the crewe members who were in need. Doctor Geiger was prepared to amputate if necessary, but thankfully the amputation needs were few. The Master Gunner, Dorian Lasseter, and the Master at Arms, Constable Heartless, maintained the guns and kept a close eye on the sea for any Spanish ships that may appear. The Bosun and the blacksmith were busy throughout the day making repairs that would be needed once we were back on board the Archangel,

Adam making nails

while Mister Merriweather the Younger attended to the food with the assistance of Mister Merriweather the Elder, our pilot Matty Black Horse, and ABS Atlas. Fionn and Sean at lunch Captain Sterling had received a wound to the head, when a powder chest on the quarterdeck accidently ignited during our last encounter, and was being given time to relax near the fire while the wound healed. The Capitaine’s Steward, Fionntan Murtaugh, managed to have Mon Capitaine kept comfortable, fed, and even had him seated a couple times throughout the day. This is no small task!
Although we were standing on French soil, I felt out of place. I missed my home, my brother, and my father, but having been away for so long I now wonder’d if I could even continue to call it home. I found that I had grown attach’d to the crewe of the Archangel, and I was looking forward to returning with them to England and resting up from our endeavors in the Mediterranean. I do not believe that I will ever grow accustom’d to battle, and to losing members of our crewe. How lucky these men are to receive a proper burial! (and how fortunate we are as well that they shall be well grounded)The Lieutenant being an officer, Mon Capitaine did all in his power to find land in which to bury the body. Burial at sea, where the fish and other sea creatures destroy your remains, makes it impossible for you to enter heaven upon your death. The crewe always makes every effort to find land when an officer dies. The seaman that we are burying was brought along as we were already burying one; we figured we should bury the other on land as well. Had it been just the seaman who passed, he would have been sent to the depths. It is all just too horrible to imagine. I hope their remains will rest easy, as both being Protestant, they have been turned away from our Catholic cemeteries on the main land.
The rain has picked up, and exhaustion is setting in. Tomorrow, we bury the dead, and soon, the wounded permitting, return to the Archangel.

J. Otte © 2013 All rights reserved

special thanks to Krystian Williams for her photographs