Archive for Adam Cyphers

London Towne, September

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2017 by creweofthearchangel

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Length of black, silk ribbon was stretched slowly across the desktop finally coming to rest upon an open bible.

Weary eyes closed against the strain of reading. Another sleepless night, another morning arriving all too early. And more funerals.

War was a miserable thing. He was still struggling to find the glory in it. He understood the need to fight, to protect those he loved, his way of life, but he could not understand the hullabaloo, the young men who hurried to pick up a musket or sword and rush headlong into…

“Hell on earth.”

“What was that, Sir?” The Irishman asked from the next room over. Ears already damaged from too much gunfire were still recovering from the din of yesterday’s battle.14492572_10154681974923825_9013517838455022855_n

Sterling glanced up, gaze darting to the sunlight that streamed through the seams between the wall boards.

A good caulking would solve all that..

But ye are not on board the ‘Angel…this place is only yours to rent…

“War, Fionn,” Sterling muttered a moment later. He realized, too late, that the steward would not hear him a second time and the question would need repeating again. He leaned back in his chair after pushing it away from the desk. Long legs unfolded before him as good eye finally noticed the holes in the new silk stockings he wore.

She would be angry. Those were the last thing she gave ye. Ye should have worn a different, older pair…

Fingers splayed as open palm slammed down upon the desk. The noise startled the steward, his head soon poking around the edge of the doorway.
“I am sorry…”

“T’is not ye Fionn. Not ye at all!” Sterling shouted, his words dripping with frustration. Leaning down, a finger dug into one hole of the wounded silk, making it worse.

“I can fix those, sir, if ye have a mind not to pillage em further,” Fionn said.

“Does not matter,” came the doleful reply.

Nothing matters now.

“Right, sir.” The steward turned about then shifted just enough to look back at his captain. “I shall have your black coat brushed and ready. A wee bit longer, sir.”

An eternity for those that still remained.

Good eye roamed once more about the room. After the battle they had made sail for the closest harbour. Londontowne. Archangel’s new home. And his.

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Sterling had agreed to rent a small tenement there, months ago, as14522914_10210957121987746_5963692726279877397_n soon as his marriage had begun to deteriorate. He still could not bear to return to the plantation. Too many memories he was unwilling to confront and now with more dead to bury, life as it had once been, slipped completely away.

Thomas, the bitter child, would see to the property and the horses. Sarah and Sean had promised to look in on things often. Fingers reached for his spectacles before he sunk down further into the chair and dared to draw Sean’s latest letter to him. His throat tightened as he read the legal papers enclosed. So difficult to digest but he swallowed all of it.

His attention was diverted as the steward appeared once more in the doorway. Black coat, furnished with weepers was held out, ready for him to slip into.

“Give me a moment…please.” Words were choked. Hand shook as he reached for quill and ink and he signed where needed. He had severed all other contact, as requested. This was all that remained. Papers were folded, secured inside a fresh sheet, sealed and addressed before he stood.

“See that you find a rider to take these to Virginia. Tell him to make all necessary haste.”

Documents were turned over to Fionn’s keeping before body passed into the cold embrace of the mourning coat.

“Are you certain, sir?”

“What else can I do?”

No more words were exchanged. Slow step brought him to collect the bible from his desk before he left the tenement. Good eye, momentarily blinded by the sun, blinked as he adjusted to the brightness. Gaze directed to the garden, overgrown and unkempt, but promising.

Madame Lasseter will be pleased with it. Someday….soon. The babe will have hours to explore and help his mother there. Ye see, life continues… there is always hope.

Suddenly he turned back into the house and plucked the papers from Fionn’s grasp. They were returned to wait upon his desk.

Perhaps ye can send them tomorrow…but not now. Not today.

“Later,” he said as he stepped past the steward.

He straightened to his full height, shoulders squaring for the tasks ahead. He could see Adam Cyphers hurrying across the green to join him. Without a sound the two fell into step together and made their way to bury the dead. After, they would all begin again.

Copyright 2017 C.A.Salone
Photos by J. Geiger; S. Mickle; M. Fink; A. Cyphers; M. Fleckenstein
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Historic London Town & Gardens
“London Town was founded in 1683 as Anne Arundel County’s seat. Its heyday lasted approximately 100 years, but the town soon dissipated thanks to change in trade routes. The only remaining historic structure on site was the William Brown House. Built in c.1760 as an upscale tavern, the William Brown House became the county’s almshouse from 1828 – 1965. Today it is the centerpiece of the historic area, which also includes a reconstructed Carpenter’s Shop and Lord Mayor’s Tenement with kitchen garden, ropewalk, and an 18th century tobacco barn. Learn more about the history of the site in the Discover London Town exhibit in the Visitor Center.” ~ Historic London Town & Garden

farewell

Lord Mayor’s Tenement and Kitchen Garden
Reconstructed on its archaeological footprint, the Lord Mayor’s Tenement would have been rented to London Town’s lower-class workers. Adjacent to the building is a kitchen garden demonstrating different foods colonists would have grown for subsistence. Visit Historic London Town’s events page for our next hearth cooking demonstrations in the Lord Mayor’s Tenement.”~Historic London Town & Garden

Kitty’s Adventures: The Treasure Coast Pirate Fest, January 3rd-February 1st ’15

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 4, 2015 by creweofthearchangel

By Kitty Sterling, daughter of Captain John Sterling and Alice Mason Sterling. 

January 29

We arrived in the dark. The night was cool and very windy, but I was not afraid because the Crewe were all there and I
knew they would all look after me. Mother and my step-father Captain Sterling were there of course, along with Joshua Merriweather, Fionntan Murtaugh, the Quartermaster Jack Roberts, and the Archangel’s blacksmith Adam Cyphers. Mother made me a cozy bed to rest and keep warm in while the adults set up the camp. When I grew tired of lying still I helped by fetching stakes and lines. The night insects sang loudly and the stars were big and bright.

January 30

I woke up just as the sun was coming up. I soon woke up Mother and talked her into taking a walk along the beach. The rising sun made the water all kinds of colors. We met some of the townspeople on our way back to camp. Breakfast was cooked in a big skillet over the fire, potatoes and onions and sausage and eggs. We all ate lots because we knew it would be a busy day. For the rest of the morning I was allowed to collect shells while the crewe readied the camp for the day and talked with the frequent visitors that stopped by.

Mr. Cyphers allowed me to play with his blacksmith hammer. I had a grand time carrying it about and stirring through the sand for rocks and small shells to test the hammer out on. Mother fussed all morning, sure I would smash my toes, but I did not smash a one! Or anyone else’s either.

Many of the landsmen who visited camp were interested in our navigation equipment. Several of the crew took turns explaining what each of the instruments did. This evening the crew joined together with the local militia for a firing demonstration. The great guns sounded out over the waters, a warning to any pirates who might be close by. 


January 31

This morning we had another fine breakfast, after which I helped by rinsing the clean dishes and stacking them to dry. When the morning work was done I explored the camp and gathered some more shells for my growing collection. One of them was nearly as big as my face!

There is a celebration in town today, and we all enjoyed the opportunity to make merry and spend time together, all while keeping a watchful eye out for pirates, of course. We celebrated Father’s birthday. Mother made some sugar-cakes and we all kicked a ball to and fro, with some of the townsfolk joining in from time to time. When I grew tired I rested in one of the hammocks. Joshua was in the other and we made a game of trying to turn one another out of them.

In the evening there was another firing demonstration. Too soon it was time to break down camp and return home. Once again I assisted by piling the stakes in their proper places and wrapping up the lines once they were removed from the tents.

Saying goodbye to the crewe is never easy, but I know it will not be long before we have more grand adventures!

 

 

Copyright May 25, 2015 S. W. Permenter

MTT: Marching Through Time

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 27, 2014 by creweofthearchangel

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel

April 25

April, typically a relaxing Month before the Hustle of the Pirate-hunting Season, has brought us to Jamestown at the behest of the Vigilant Crewe with whom we often work closely. They are attending to Business in the port City and the Crewe of the Archangel has joined them. Dorian and I made the familiar Journey from Carolina, stopping only once to obtain Monsieur Cyphers from Hampton, and arrived in Town late this Afternoon under dark Skies and in pouring Rain. We were greeted by Capitain McGuyver, his Wife, Nancy, and several of the Vigilant Crewe Members.



We were surprised to be welcomed as well as by two of our own Archangel Crewe Members, Monsieur Atlas and Monsieur Knyff who had not been expected to join us until Morning.
Following a multitude of Greetings, we quickly unloaded the Carriage and as we readied our Room we received Word from Capitaine Sterling that he and Fionn were to arrive in Town no later than Midnight. The Capitaine’s Message also carried a somber Piece of News: a beloved Member of the Community had passed away that Afternoon following a two year Battle with Illness. Capitaine Sterling asked that we make this News known to all present. The News was heavily received, and Silence took hold of the small Gathering of Sailors for more than a few Moments. T’is never easy to learn of the Passing of those we hold dear, but being with those of like Mind and Understanding made the News easier to bear.
After all present were settled in our Rooms, we made our way to a local Establishment both for Dinner and to toast the Life of our recently departed Friend. By then the Rain was slowing to a Drizzle and we had all begun to dry out from the Deluge that had occurred not but a couple of Hours prior. Dinner was plentiful and filling, and the Company was most heartily enjoyed; however, a damp Weariness was taking its hold on each of us. As the Food and Drink were nearly gone, the Table quieted and we knew that it was time for us to depart. As we arrived back at our Room, we received Word that Capitaine Sterling and Fionntan Murtaugh had arrived and they were making themselves comfortable in their respective Rooms. As I write this, I am perched in front of the Fire prepared for bed while Dorian checks in on Capitaine Sterling. The damp Weather reminds me of Home and I find myself dozing off every now and again with thoughts of what feels like Lives past.

April 26

We awoke this Morning and, after readying ourselves, made our way to the local Tavern for a light morning Meal. The Sun was bright, the Skies clear, and the Area was drying out from the Rains of yesterday. My Demeanor had brightened some as well, as I was off to the Shops near the Docks. I had been given an Invitation to meet with a family-trained Apothecary and spend the Day discussing the Trade with her while Dorian saw to his Duties as Master Gunner. I was somewhat Nervous, as my Training was informal at best in the Arts of Herbs, and my Knowledge is limited to those Herbs with which I am familiar. As I stepped into the Shop and looked around, I was met with the Aroma of dried Herbs and a smiling Apothecary greeting me from the Counter.
The Conversation in the Shop was much more relaxed than I had anticipated as she and I discussed our various Experiences with Herbs and making herbal Remedies, the Storage of our Herbs, and the Resources available should we ever need to use Herbs with which we are not familiar. After spending the Day orally compiling our Information, we concluded that perhaps we need to once again meet and create a Resource that could be then shared with the general Public. I left the Shop today feeling enlightened and hopeful that both she and I could benefit from such a Partnership, should our Circumstances favor such an Undertaking.
Following a lovely Dinner in the Tavern, some members of the Crewe joined with Vigilant Crew for Songs by the Fire. The rest of the Archangel Crewe, myself included, sat in a Corner listening to the Songs and holding friendly Conversation. After some time had passed, we realized that Clouds had covered the Sky and that it was beginning to rain. Dorian and I returned to our Room where I am now writing this entry and he is organizing the sea chest. Tomorrow, after some last minute business, we will once again return to the south road and our cottage in Carolina.

April 27

With a little more Time today I wanted to take in the Atmosphere of the Town before we departed. I donned my sailor’s Attire and wandered the Town as “Joseph” Legard, greeting others on the Street who were none the wiser. The Town was made up of a variety of Shops and Activities, with most of the Activity centered around the Tavern and the Docks. In the Tavern, Patrons were taking part in card Games while snacking on Fruit and Biscuits and drinking the available Beverages; on the Docks, Sailors were splicing Lines and testing repaired log Lines in the Water; a Woman was attending to Laundry at the end of the Dock; Captain McGuyver and other Vigilant Crew members were attending to business in his office on the docks; Capitaine Sterling could be found attending to business with Cargo costs and taxes; Monsieur Lasseter was attending to the cleaning and maintenance of the Firearms and edged Weapons; Vigilant Crew members were handling the Shot and various other Weapons; The Archangel's Blacksmith chatting with the Vigilant's Heidiand Members of both Crewes could found helping in the Kitchen.
As the Work was completed, we all began to pack up our Belongings for our individual journeys home. Dorian, Adam, and I were permitted to leave as early as possible, as News had reached us of foul Weather at Home while we were away which carried the Potential of damaging our Property. After saying our Goodbyes, which is always the most difficult Part of an event, we made our way South to Carolina. The Journey was smooth, and we arrived Home slightly earlier than anticipated, finding that only a Flag perched on our Home had been damaged; the worst of it had been East of our Cottage.




Archangel

Copyright 2014 J.Otte

Congratulations to the Crewe of the Archangel

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 31, 2014 by creweofthearchangel

This year at Jamestown Settlement’s Military Through the Ages, the Crewe won, in the pre-modern category: honorary mention for Best Cooking, First Place for Best Clothing and First Place for Best Camp. But the best was the compliments from the judges who came to tell us that our documentation set the new standard. Well done Archangels.

Laundress Mae Harrington Laundress Mae Harrington
Mlle Josephine Legard Mlle. Josephine Legard
Armourer & Blacksmith Adam Cyphers Armourer & Blacksmith Adam Cyphers
Dr. Jerome GeigerShip’s Surgeon, Dr. Jerome Geiger
Master-at-Arms Heartless Master-at-Arms Heartless
Cook & Able Seaman David M. AtlasCook & Able Seaman David M. Atlas
Master Gunner Dorian LasseterMaster Gunner Dorian Lasseter
Midshipman Joshua MerriweatherMidshipman Joshua Merriweather
Lady's Maid Charlotte Cole & Alice Mason Sterling
Lacemakers: Blue Hood: Lady’s Maid Charlotte Cole. Cocked Hat: Captain’s Wife Alice Mason Sterling
Cook's Mate John KnyffCook’s Mate John Knyff
Quartermaster Jack RobertsQuartermaster Jack Roberts
Bosun's Mate Mitch O'SionnachBosun’s Mate Mitchell O’Sionnach
Sean with ship biscuitMidshipman Sean Merriweather
L'il SnotLearning the Lace trade, Alice Mason’s daughter KittyFionn MurtaughCaptain’s Steward Fionn Murtaugh
Bosun Israel CrossBosun Israel Cross
PrincessCaptain Sterling, Master Gunner Lasseter and Princess


Crewe Photo
Military Through the Ages 2014

Beaufort Pirate Invasion 8-10 August

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 19, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

Excerpts from the Journals of Alice Mason and Mae Harrington
Alice Mason and Mae Harrington

Alice Mason
Thursday

After a long but uneventful journey, we are docked in the town of Beaufort. Credible reports of invading ships from Spain led the captain to make this detour. The townspeople welcomed the arrival of reinforcements against the Spanish pirates and have been most accommodating. Other ships already wait in the harbor, lines and sails prepared for the invasion, whenever it comes.

Being civilians, the laundress Mae Harrington, Kitty, and I were some of the last to disembark the Archangel and arrive in camp. Already present were Mr. Dorian Lasseter the Master Gunner, Josephine Legard his indentured, Matthew Black Horse the heathen pilot, Mr. Adam Cyphers the blacksmith, Sean Merriweather and Joshua Merriweather, Dr. Gerome Geiger, Mr. Mitchell O’Sionnach, Fionntan Murtaugh the captain’s steward, and of course, Captain John Sterling himself.
pennant new
The night is humid and heavy, the heat of the day lingering long after the sun has set. Kitty and I, together with the unsettling laundress, have been given temporary quarters in an unused portion of the goal until our tent can be readied on the morrow. T’is time we got some rest, but I will be sleeping with one eye open…

Mae Harrington
Friday

My eyes open to sunlight filtering through the bars of the gaol windows. Mistress Mason and the child have begun to stir, and I hear the sounds of the camp awakening outside. I arise and dress quickly. Hurrying down the stairs and out of the gaol, I encounter the steward. Fionn directs me to where our cargo was unloaded the previous night, and I sort through crates until I locate my belongings, as well as those of Mistress Mason and Kitty. With the assistance of a few members of the crewe, our tent is quickly erected and our belongings stowed away.

Now the day’s work begins in earnest.
487968_201140483388648_1991909703_nCaptain Sterling, Mister Lasseter and the men-at-arms are engaged in checking and rechecking the state of their weapons and discussing plans of action. The steward is preparing breakfast and tidying the Captain’s tent.

Mlle. Legard is at work with her herbs, laying in stock any medicines that may be needed after the battle. Likewise the good doctor is taking stock of his implements and preparing for an influx of the wounded.

Mistress Mason settles herself on a cushion beneath the shade of a tree with a delicate bit of sewing as Kitty explores the encampment. 581751_10151796609088497_1698029913_nHaving suffered an injury to the knee prior to our departure, the Blacksmith reclines on a rug and keeps us company as we go about our duties. I enlist the help of the heathen guide and one of the midshipmen to fill the large washtubs and call for dirty laundry.

As the day wears on, there is a constant stream of both militia and civilians through our camp. The reputation of the Archangel’s Captain and crewe has indeed preceded us. Gunners stop to admire our great guns and ask questions as to their operation and care, civilians walk past with wide-eyed children clinging to their hands, curiosity eventually prodding them to say a few words or ask questions. The doctor’s instruments, the heathen’s trappings, ship’s navigational equipment, the games played to pass long voyages at sea, even the mundane methods of laundry are of great interest to some. Kitty drew smiles and laughter when she decided that my tub of clean water was the ideal place to escape the heat and dust.
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The hours pass quickly. As the evening approaches, a call for entertainment is made throughout the encampments. The best talents are nominated to represent each crewe, and a stage is set up. The steward, Fionn, has a magnificent singing voice and is elected to represent the Archangel’s crewe. Singers, musicians, poets, actors…a diverse lot of entertainers join together and give us a most enjoyable evening.

Dinner1003508_201137613388935_651941966_n is a quiet affair. Tomorrow will most likely bring a battle, and rest is needed. We sit together in groups of twos and threes, talking quietly until the call for lanterns-out is given.

543412_10151805320263497_209061262_nMae Harrington
Saturday

Saturday morning broke hot and humid. All over the encampment preparations for battle continue. Breakfast is hurried, appetites are small. Mid-morning, the boom of a distant cannon echoes across the water, and a shout goes up. Spanish warships have been sighted far out in the bay and are advancing toward the town with great speed.1176244_10151805228993497_1000591672_n Mistress Mason, Kitty and I bid the Captain and gunners farewell as they gather their weapons and hasten to join the other defenders along the waterfront. Long hours pass with no news of how the battle fares. 1174745_10151805316268497_1901944436_nShouts, the boom of the great guns and staccato bursts of fire from the small arms provide a persistent background to our mornings’ work. At long last the noise subsided, and our crew returned bringing tidings of victory. The Spanish are defeated, those remaining alive have returned to their ships and fled, and the handful taken prisoner are swiftly confined in the gaol. 1000941_10151805322838497_1335752218_n

Alice Mason
Saturday

There is much celebrating after the battle, with music and dancing all along the waterfront. Due to my Turkish attire no doubt I was invited to participate in one of the dances for the amusement of the militia and townsfolk, and found that I enjoyed it a good deal, though I am certain the captain did not approve.
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The festive mood lingered even hours later, when the captured pirates were brought forth to be hanged. Captain Sterling as the proper authority heard the men plead for their lives. The first two were pardoned, 535869_618261141527606_1726804475_nhaving been pressed into service by the pirates. The third was not so fortunate. 1174982_618264384860615_1972795270_nAn Irishman by name of Laughlin Tierney, he was defiant from the start. When offered a final request he asked for a tankard of water, of which he only drank a small portion and then flung the greater part into Captain Sterling’s face. After that little time was wasted. 1186861_618267444860309_1640788118_nrobinAmid the raucous demands of the crowd, the crate that supported the man was kicked from beneath him and he danced about on the end of the line before finally hanging slack.

The remainder of the afternoon was spent about our duties. Numerous townsfolk still filtered through the camp, discussing the events of the day amongst themselves and with various crew officers. As the sun began to sink lower and the heat of the day began to ease, everyone gave themselves to more pleasurable amusements. The captain arranged a game of Skittles, or Nine-Pins, with the Merriweather boys and Kitty and it was difficult to tell whom enjoyed the game most. skittles game tupMost of the crew gathered to watch, and afterward we all sat down to another fine meal prepared by the townsfolk.

That is always the best part of any day, when the crew and passengers such as myself and Kitty sit together at the captain’s table, to fellowship and enjoy the harmony we find amongst ourselves. Even the captain and I have learned to put aside our differences for those couple of hours, and the conversation and laughter flows freely. 1150258_201741913328505_1748179776_n

As night came on the weather glass indicated incoming weather, so the camp was a flurry of activity as tents were secured, belongings covered, and all made ready for the storms. In the end there was only a little rain instead of the squall line that we feared, but for the duration of it the majority of the crew sheltered in another unused portion of the goal, to continue the fellowship begun at the dinner table until it was time to retire for bed.

Alice Mason
Sunday

Today we are to return to the Archangel and continue on our voyage. The day is as sweltering as the two previous. By mid-morning trunks are packed and tents lowered. When all the canvas is folded and stored away we say our final goodbyes to the townsfolk. The noon hour passes before we finally go on our way in the afternoon, leaving this small town that has found a place in all our hearts. 935937_10151796661063497_1558886659_n1170771_201295210039842_431509565_n734345_10151803396053497_1107213202_n

Copyright8/2013S.W.Permenter/J.Ashing
With special thanks to Diane Shultz for the use of her photographs.

Military Through the Ages, Jamestown Settlement, Williamsburg, Virginia

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 2, 2013 by creweofthearchangel

josephine

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures with the Crewe of the Archangel

Friday, 28, April 1719
I stood on the deck as the Archangel moor’d just off of the western shore of Ile de Ré around midday. As the crewe load’d the boats, which would ferry the burial party and our necessary goods ashore, I could not help but admire the beauty of the island. Somewhere in my mind, I recall’d being a little girl and overhearing my father talk about the religious siege that took place long ago on the island. It was hard to believe that such a beautiful spot held such a violent past. My thoughts were broken by the Master Gunner’s voice calling me to his side. It was time to go disembark.
Those of us going ashore climb’d into the boats and made our way to the beach, along with several injured and two dead crewe members, one of whom was Lieutenant Hazzard. Images of the most recent battle in the Mediterranean flash’d through my mind and I shuddered as I tried to remove it from my head. The cloudy weather add’d to the somber mood as we work’d to set up camp and build a fire before darkness fell. The dead men were laid out under a canopy within our camp, the Lieutenant in his burial clothes and the seaman in his hammock. The Archangel, having suffer’d minor damages during an attempt on a merchant ship during our latest conflict, the War of Quadruple Alliance in the Mediterranean, made way for La Rochelle on the mainland for quick repairs. Although we hope it to be a short stay, the officers intend to remain until the wounded, the captain being one of such, recuperate. We had removed several great guns from the ship when we left, bringing them on shore with us as a means of protection. Having set up camp and eaten a light dinner, we have retired to our tents for the night. Tomorrow begins the burial process.

Saturday, 29 April, 1719
We awoke early, as there was much work to be done, and found that the weather had deteriorated further. The clouds overhead open’d up around mid-morning, forcing several crewe members to maintain the fire and the rest of us to move as much of our chores under canvas as possible. I, myself, moved my basket under the canopy with the doctor and the dead, and began attending to my remedies. Josephine and Matt by the fire With the injured members of the crewe among us, I was only too happy to assist Dr. Geiger. I had brought along several simple herbal physicks for injuries, both internal and external, and spent the day prepping the herbs and administering them to the crewe members who were in need. Doctor Geiger was prepared to amputate if necessary, but thankfully the amputation needs were few. The Master Gunner, Dorian Lasseter, and the Master at Arms, Constable Heartless, maintained the guns and kept a close eye on the sea for any Spanish ships that may appear. The Bosun and the blacksmith were busy throughout the day making repairs that would be needed once we were back on board the Archangel,

Adam making nails

while Mister Merriweather the Younger attended to the food with the assistance of Mister Merriweather the Elder, our pilot Matty Black Horse, and ABS Atlas. Fionn and Sean at lunch Captain Sterling had received a wound to the head, when a powder chest on the quarterdeck accidently ignited during our last encounter, and was being given time to relax near the fire while the wound healed. The Capitaine’s Steward, Fionntan Murtaugh, managed to have Mon Capitaine kept comfortable, fed, and even had him seated a couple times throughout the day. This is no small task!
Although we were standing on French soil, I felt out of place. I missed my home, my brother, and my father, but having been away for so long I now wonder’d if I could even continue to call it home. I found that I had grown attach’d to the crewe of the Archangel, and I was looking forward to returning with them to England and resting up from our endeavors in the Mediterranean. I do not believe that I will ever grow accustom’d to battle, and to losing members of our crewe. How lucky these men are to receive a proper burial! (and how fortunate we are as well that they shall be well grounded)The Lieutenant being an officer, Mon Capitaine did all in his power to find land in which to bury the body. Burial at sea, where the fish and other sea creatures destroy your remains, makes it impossible for you to enter heaven upon your death. The crewe always makes every effort to find land when an officer dies. The seaman that we are burying was brought along as we were already burying one; we figured we should bury the other on land as well. Had it been just the seaman who passed, he would have been sent to the depths. It is all just too horrible to imagine. I hope their remains will rest easy, as both being Protestant, they have been turned away from our Catholic cemeteries on the main land.
The rain has picked up, and exhaustion is setting in. Tomorrow, we bury the dead, and soon, the wounded permitting, return to the Archangel.

J. Otte © 2013 All rights reserved

special thanks to Krystian Williams for her photographs

Beaufort Pirate Invasion, 2012

Posted in Event Journal with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 28, 2012 by creweofthearchangel

Josephine’s Journal
The Account of an Indentured Servant’s Adventures
with the Crewe of the Archangel

Beaufort Pirate Invasion,
August 10-11 2012

Standing tryal

When word of an anticipated pirate invasion in Beaufort reached Captain Sterling of the private ship of war Archangel, he decided to make a voyage to the Carolina colony to fend off the verminous pirates and to protect the port towne of Beaufort. Continue reading